Who’ll Stop the Rain: Green Infrastructure in Schenley Park

Big, green things are in the works in Schenley Park and the Panther Hollow Watershed.

If you’ve been near Bartlett Playground in Schenley Park lately, you might have seen some of our progress on a nearby hillside, which right now looks a little like

woz-leavingkansas

Soon, though, the area will look something like

Is that the Cathedral of Learning off in the distance?

Instead of a field of poppies, though, a lush, textured, and completely native meadow will be springing up this summer. The meadow will be replacing a swatch of non-native, monochrome grass as part of a larger effort to revitalize the Panther Hollow Watershed.

You may be asking yourself: Why remove a field of grass? Doesn’t grass absorb rainwater, keeping it out of our sewer system?

Answer: Yes and no. Grass does absorb a bit of rainwater. But with its shallow roots and often compacted soil underneath, it can almost as hard as a slab of concrete for water to penetrate. On this hillside between Bartlett and Beacon Streets, towards the upper sections of the Panther Hollow Watershed, we see a stellar opportunity to reduce environmentally-taxing maintenance (read: mowing), establish a walking path, and capture rainwater in the ground rather than having it run right into our sewer systems.

bartlett before

The grass to by phased out between Beacon and Bartlett Streets

bartlett after

A concept drawing of what this area will look like after, complete with wildflower meadow and walking path

Like many older cities, Pittsburgh has a combined sewer system in which both stormwater and sewage flow in the same pipe. The system is prone to overflows, with rainfalls greater than ¼ inch triggering large quantities of untreated sewage to discharge into our rivers. By increasing the amount of water retained in the soil throughout the watershed, we’re keeping rainwater out of the park streams and City sewers. This project is the first stage of a plan to reduce the volume of water flowing through the watershed.  This summer and fall, infiltration trenches and berms will be created along the street. Combined, these projects will remove an estimated 1.7 million gallons of water from the combined sewer system.

As the grass on the hillside along Beacon Street dries out, we ask that everyone stays on the marked path so that the meadow seedlings have a chance to really take hold. The seed mix that we’re using can handle the foot traffic anticipated for the Vintage Grand Prix. Until then, excuse the look of this meadow-in-progress and look forward to a ‘low-mow’ biodiversity magnet and an overall green improvement in Schenley Park!

This project is done in collaboration with the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority (ALCOSAN), Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority (PWSA), and the Department of Public Works (DPW).

Thank you to the generous funders who are making this project come to life. We’d like to thank Allegheny County Conservation District, Dominion Foundation, Western PA Conservancy, Foundation for Pennsylvania Watersheds, and The Pittsburgh Foundation for their support!

2 thoughts on “Who’ll Stop the Rain: Green Infrastructure in Schenley Park

  1. Pingback: Better Bikeways, Better Watersheds: Big Plans for Schenley Park | Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy Blog

  2. Pingback: Pardon the Dust: Park Projects in Progress | Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy Blog

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